Tips for how to paint a fireplace hearth

Home is where the hearth is

With the return of winter and cold, dark nights, my nesting bug has also come back. So there are of course some DIY posts coming up—first is a recent home improvement that took us less than an hour, cost under £10 (£6.40 to be exact) and gave our living room a major facelift.

How to paint your fireplace hearth

Supplies:

  • Masonry paint (I’d recommend Rustin’s in Matt Black, £4)
  • Paint brush (ours was a 1.5 inch Homebase brush, 40p in the clearance section)
  • Masking tape
  • Newspaper

How to paint a concrete fireplace hearth

What to do:

Vacuum/sweep your hearth then a scrub it with a damp sponge, so as to get a clean application.

Stick masking tape around any edges you don’t want to get paint on, like your mantlepiece, and tape newspaper around the edge of your floor. Be as precise as possible—prevention is better than cure!

Painting a fireplace hearth, step-by-step

We then hoovered our hearth a last time, to make sure it was squeaky clean and we’d get the best possible application.

Give your paint a good stir (chopsticks are perfect for this!) and apply coat number one.

Guide to how to paint a hearth

After allowing the recommended drying time, usually a couple of hours, make sure your first coat is dry and still free of dirt.

Apply your second coat. Allow to dry again. You’re done!

DIY: tips for painting a fireplace hearth yourself

As you can see, there was/is some damage to our hearth. I debated filling in the cracks before painting but a) we live in a top floor flat so I didn’t fancy traipsing up and down communal stairs with wet concrete, and b) I hoped the dark paint would just camouflage blemishes—they’re part of the history and character of our home! For the record, it came out even better than expected.

We also thought we might have to paint our cast iron fireplace, if it looked faded in comparison to the fresh black paint of the hearth. Luckily (as it’s delicate and painting might’ve done more harm than good) it looks totally fine after a gentle clean.

I hope you found this post useful and that it’s motivated you to paint your hearth if this (honestly tiny) job has also been on your to-do list for almost 2 years…! :)

How to paint your fireplace's hearth: a step-by-step guide

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